If you would like to know more about Tolerance By religious leaders ,Writers and scientists please read below

"Tolerance is an act of humanity, which we must nurture and enact each in own lives every day, to rejoice in the diversity that makes us strong and the values that bring us together." —

UNESCO Director-General Audrey Azoulay

http://www.un.org/en/events/toleranceday/

Tolerance can be defined as a fair and objective attitude towards those whose lifestyle differs from yours. The level of tolerance in your life can be attributed to levels of happiness and contentment, as many researchers have pointed out; however, the same researchers appear to struggle when examining paradoxical questions such as, 'are tolerant people more happy, or are happy people more tolerant?'

Tolerance can be defined as a fair and objective attitude towards those whose lifestyle differs from yours. The level of tolerance in your life can be attributed to levels of happiness and contentment, as many researchers have pointed out; however, the same researchers appear to struggle when examining paradoxical questions such as, 'are tolerant people more happy, or are happy people more tolerant?'

The book The Truth about Tolerance[4] describes ten “truths of tolerance”. They are paraphrased here:

Tolerance is a patience toward a practice or opinion you disapprove of — Tolerance is being agreeable—listening carefully and treating the person with dignity and respect—while you disagree. You continue a critical analysis of all you know and believe to be true, in light of the different viewpoint expressed by the person you disagree with. In the best case each of you has learned from the other. In the end you may or may not be persuaded, yet because of your tolerance the relationship has been strengthened by yourdialogue, not eroded by obstinacy or mistrust. Without disagreement there is not tolerance, only affirmation. As Voltaire famously said: “I disapprove of what you say, but I will defend to the death your right to say it.”

 

https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Virtues/Tolerance

In his last address to the nation as the Head of State, President Pranab Mukherjee on Monday stressed the need for pluralism and tolerance, saying that the soul of India resides in these values.

He also made a strong pitch for freeing public discourse from violence, both “physical as well as verbal”.

“Multiplicity in culture, faith and language is what makes India special. We derive our strength from tolerance,” Mr. Mukherjee said, asserting that plurality had become an essential part of the country after centuries of assimilation of ideas. The soul of India resided in pluralism and tolerance, he added.

http://www.thehindu.com/news/national/soul-of-india-is-in-tolerance-pranab/article19346753.ece

I have been impressed to speak on the subject of tolerance—a virtue much needed in our turbulent world. But in discussing this topic, we must recognize at the outset that there is a difference between tolerance and tolerate. Your gracious tolerance for an individual does not grant him or her license to do wrong, nor does your tolerance obligate you to tolerate his or her misdeed. That distinction is fundamental to an understanding of this vital virtue.

I attended a “laboratory of tolerance” some months ago when I had the privilege of participating in the Parliament of the World’s Religions. There I conversed with good men and women representing many religious groups. Again I sensed the advantages of ethnic and cultural diversity and reflected once more on the importance of religious freedom and tolerance.

Russell M. Nelson (President of the church of Jesus Christ)

 https://www.lds.org/general-conference/1994/04/teach-us-tolerance-and-love.p35?lang=eng

The truth of the matter is that “tolerance” is not such a lofty concept. Sure, if we compare it with outright bigotry, xenophobia, anti-Semitism, Islamophobia, sexism, racism, homophobia, and transphobia that we see today, tolerance is indeed a virtue. But dig a little deeper, and behind tolerance is a concept far from our loftiest ideals.

Tolerance has a yucky origin. It comes from medieval toxicology and pharmacology. It essentially has to do with how much foreign and poisonous substance a body can “tolerate” before it dies. When we apply this paradigm to a nation, what we are talking about is ultimately that some people (majority-white culture in the case of the United States of America) gets to be the body, the host, and the rest are not even guests, they are parasites. Viruses. Invading, disease-inducing agents of disease. And, not surprisingly, it is often immigrants, Muslims, Hispanics, gays/lesbians who are described as being on the recipient side of “tolerance.” [Have you ever heard someone talk about being tolerant towards white people?]

Omid Safi (Columnist for On Being)

https://onbeing.org/blog/omid-safi-the-trouble-with-tolerance/

Tolerance is the appreciation of diversity and the ability to live and let others live. It is the ability to exercise a fair and objective attitude towards those whose opinions, practices, religion, nationality and so on differ from one's own.[1] As William Ury notes, "tolerance is not just agreeing with one another or remaining indifferent in the face of injustice, but rather showing respect for the essential humanity in every person."[2]

Sara Peterson (Program Officer at The Coexistence Initiative)

https://www.beyondintractability.org/essay/tolerance

 

 

Andrew Murphy, a scholar from Rutgers University, describes tolerance as

the self-restraint of not restricting or reducing the rights or autonomy of others, or other ways of being and acting.

But in a global context of heightened bigotry, some people see an appeal to tolerance as a defence of hate speech or racism. This is not what tolerance is. All views and actions should only be tolerated to the extent that they don’t harm others – physically, psychologically or emotionally.

According to the classical Greek philosopher Socrates, tolerance is about the pursuit of truth. It is about being prepared to see the value of another person’s perspective or truth. This necessarily means humbling oneself and acknowledging one’s

own limitations and fallibility. Tolerance, then, is fundamentally about equality; about recognising the capacity for both moral truth and error in ourselves and others.

Amy Gutmann from the University of Pennsylvania describes tolerance as

agreeing to disagree about beliefs and practices that are a matter of basic liberty.

This, she argues, is a way to ensure larger civic participation of people, who are recognized as equals by their fellow citizens.

Simply put, tolerance is the choice to “agree to disagree” because we respect each other as moral and civic equals.

 

https://theconversation.com/how-tolerance-enhances-democracy-and-the-quest-for-human-flourishing-83538